Wyoming State Outdoors

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Wyoming State Parks

Bear River State Park
Abundant wildlife including our own "herd" of bison afford rare viewing opportunities and give the visitor a taste of wild Wyoming. Hiking, skiing trails, picnic shelters and a lazy river all combine to make Bear River State Park a unique Wyoming experience. Enjoy your stay. For information call: (307)789-6547


Guernsey State Park
If you are looking for a unique campground experience or a large expanse of water perfect for boating and water-skiing, Guernsey State Park is the place. Located one mile northwest of the town Guernsey along the North Platte River, the park is filled with many wonders. Sandstone cliffs overlooking cooling water-filled canyons will lure you from your campsite. Hiking trails, birdwatching, and photo opportunities will pull you even further. Most of the park roads are paved, though some are just gaveled, so you might ask at the entrance fee gates about specific information regarding roads and campground availability. The park's area consists of high hills with generous stands of pine and juniper trees. The soil varies from large sandstone cliffs to sandy beaches and prairie areas. The grass ranges from the sparse to heavy stands of grass and sagebrush, depending on the soil. The scenic hills are part of the Hartville Uplift, forming one of the most attractive areas in the southeastern corner of Wyoming. For information call: (307)836-2334


The Hot Springs State Park
You'll enjoy our soothing waters, views of the unforgettable bison, and some of the loveliest flower gardens in the state. The Hot Springs State Bison Herd is the central herd for the Wyoming State Parks. In addition to those at Hot Springs Park, bison are also located at Bear River State Park. The herds vary in size depending on the graze available and the needs within the state herd system. The suspension foot bridge across the Bighorn River is commonly called "The Swinging Bridge." It is presently under reconstruction as rust became a major concern and large portions will have to be entirely replaced. The Wyoming and the North Dakota National Guard are completing the removal and replacement work with the cooperative efforts of the Wyoming Transportation Department, Hot Springs State Park, Hot Springs County, the local Historical Society and many other interested individuals. The structure was removed in July 1991 and was replaced during 1992. The bridge offers a unique vantage point from which to view the Bighorn River and Mineral Terrace. In 1896 a treaty was signed with the Shoshone and the Arapaho which gave the public use of the largest mineral hot springs in the world. The hot springs was known as having "healing water." There is no fee for using the Bath House; however, there is a nominal charge for rental of towels and swimsuits. The hot mineral water is maintained at 104 degrees Fahrenheit to provide the safest healing water possible. A time limit of thirty minutes is set for the soaking time for safety reasons. For information call: (307)864-2176


Sinks Canyon State Park
Sinks Canyon is so named because the Middle Fork of the Popo Agie, a rushing mountain river, flows out of the Wind River Mountains and through the Canyon. Halfway down the canyon the river abruptly turns into a large limestone cavern, and the crashing water "sinks" into fissures and cracks at the back of the cave. The river is underground for 1/4 mile until it emerges down canyon in a large calm pool called "The Rise" and then continues its course into the valley below. Where the water goes while it is underground is unknown. The sinks narrow to small, unexplorable log and rock jammed fissures. The Sinks and Rise occur in the thick, easily eroded off-white Madison Limestone formation. The amount of water flowing into the Sinks varies with the season. The average amount of water in the river is 150 cubic feet per second. During high water during spring run-off over 500 cubic feet of water per second roar down the rocky Popo Agie River channel. For many years it was unproven that the water flowing into the Sinks was the same water flowing out at the Rise. Dye tests have proven it is the same water but have revealed other mysteries: it takes the water flowing into the Sinks over two hours to reappear at the Rise. Geologists speculate that while underground the water circulates up and down and through many narrow, winding passages and pools until it resurfaces. It was also discovered that more water flows out at the Rise than goes in at the Sinks. The additional water may be coming from underground springs or other sinks formations in the area. It is unknown exactly how old the Sinks are although they are likely an Ice Age feature thousands of years old. The massive glaciers that carved the canyon exposed the soft limestone and the millions of gallons of water from the melting ice helped erode the underground passages. Native Americans knew of the Sinks for generations. The first white men to see them were fur trappers in the early 1800s. For information call: (307)332-3077


Camping and Hiking in Wyoming

Buffalo Bill State Park
The history of Buffalo Bill Reservoir and "Cody Country" is rooted in the rich lore of the old West. Buffalo Bill State Park was named for Colonel William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody, famous as a wild west showman, promoter and developer. He first came to the region in the 1870's as a guide for a survey expedition and spent the next 20 years guiding and sponsoring hunting parties in the area. "Buffalo Bill" Cody was influential in bringing irrigation and agricultural development into the area and founded the town that bears his name. Some of the land now occupied by Buffalo Bill State Park was originally owned by Colonel Cody and was acquired from him by the federal government to implement the reservoir project. Work began on the dam in 1905. When completed in 1910 it was the highest dam in the world at 325 feet. Buffalo Bill State Park was established in 1957 and provided recreational areas and facilities along the original shoreline. In 1993 an eight year project was completed which raised the crest of the dam 25 feet and increased the reservoir storage capacity. The enlarged reservoir inundated the former recreation areas which required the removal of the old park facilities. Buffalo Bill State Park has been redeveloped as part . There are two developed campgrounds at Buffalo Bill State Park. North Shore Bay Campground (35 sites: 32 pull through sites and 3 designated tent sites) is located approx. 9 miles west of Cody on US Highway 14-16-20 North Fork Highway. North Fork Campground (62 SITES: 56 pull through sites and 3 designated tent sites) is located approx. 14 miles west of Cody on (North Fork Highway). Campsites have pull-through parking (except designated tent sites), table and grills. Hookups are not available but water hydrants and restrooms are convenient to all sites. Roads and parking areas are paved.Campsites are available on a "first come, first served" only. Reservations cannot be made. Trout Creek Group Camping Area is located within North Fork Campground. This area provides a large shelter with tables and grill, an area for tents, and enough parking space for a group of trailers, RV's etc. The group camping area is available on a reserved use basis only. For information call: (307)587-9227


Curt Gowdy State Park
Curt Gowdy State Park, named after the famous broadcaster, was established in 1971 through a lease agreement with the city of Cheyenne and the Boy Scouts. Today it is administered by the Division of State Parks and Historic Sites, Wyoming Department of Commerce. This region was a favored camping area for the Comanche, Pawnee, Crow and Shoshone during their search for bison. Other tribes, including the Iowa, Cheyenne, Arapaho and Sioux are thought to have roamed the area also. The arrival of Union Pacific construction crews in the 1860s caused Native Americans to be pressured on the ever-shrinking hunting lands and their presence diminished into oblivion on the lands now known as Curt Gowdy State Park. For information call: (307)632-7946


Seminoe State Park
The Seminoe Mountains around Seminoe State Park were once the site for gold prospecting during the late 1800s. The name "Seminoe" is commonly assumed to come from the Seminole tribe, but is an Americanized spelling of the French name Cimineau. Basil Cimineau Lajeunesse was a French trapper in the area in the 1800. All of designated campsites have picnic areas and campfire rings. Restroom facilities and drinking water are within close proximity to each campsite in both the North and the South Red Hills areas of the park. A trailer dump station and pull through sites are available in the North Red Hills Campground. A 35' R.V. length or less is recommended at this park. Limited services and facilities are available during the winter months. Tire chains and/or four wheel drives only are recommended during winter weather from Seminoe State Park North to the Miracle Mile and Alcova Dam Areas. For information call: (307)320-3013


Sinks Canyon State Park
Sinks Canyon is so named because the Middle Fork of the Popo Agie, a rushing mountain river, flows out of the Wind River Mountains and through the Canyon. Halfway down the canyon the river abruptly turns into a large limestone cavern, and the crashing water "sinks" into fissures and cracks at the back of the cave. The river is underground for 1/4 mile until it emerges down canyon in a large calm pool called "The Rise" and then continues its course into the valley below. Where the water goes while it is underground is unknown. The sinks narrow to small, unexplorable log and rock jammed fissures. The Sinks and Rise occur in the thick, easily eroded off-white Madison Limestone formation. The amount of water flowing into the Sinks varies with the season. The average amount of water in the river is 150 cubic feet per second. During high water during spring run-off over 500 cubic feet of water per second roar down the rocky Popo Agie River channel. For many years it was unproven that the water flowing into the Sinks was the same water flowing out at the Rise. Dye tests have proven it is the same water but have revealed other mysteries: it takes the water flowing into the Sinks over two hours to reappear at the Rise. Geologists speculate that while underground the water circulates up and down and through many narrow, winding passages and pools until it resurfaces. It was also discovered that more water flows out at the Rise than goes in at the Sinks. The additional water may be coming from underground springs or other sinks formations in the area. It is unknown exactly how old the Sinks are although they are likely an Ice Age feature thousands of years old. The massive glaciers that carved the canyon exposed the soft limestone and the millions of gallons of water from the melting ice helped erode the underground passages. Native Americans knew of the Sinks for generations. The first white men to see them were fur trappers in the early 1800s. Sinks Canyon State Park offers 30 camping sites. Many of these sites are located along the river amid jumbled granite boulders, lodgepole pine and aspens. Some of the sites are accessible to R.V's up to 40' long. Hiking trails are available across the river from Popo Agie Campground. A one mile loop and a four mile loop start at the suspension bridge in the upper end of the campground. Sawmill Campground at the mouth of the canyon offers five sites and a new handicap accessible site and fishing pier by the Popo Agie River. Both campgrounds have drinking water and latrine type toilets. No hookups are available at either campground. All sites are available on a first come first serve basis. Camping is $4.00 per night and there are self registration canisters at both campgrounds For information call: (307)332-3077


Hunting and Fishing in Wyoming

Boysen State Park
Whether it's fishing, boating, or just relaxing, we think you'll find Boysen a good place to be. Most of the facilities are around the lake but two campgrounds are below the dam along the Wind River. The majority of the park is surrounded by sagebrush covered hills. The elevation is about 4,800 feet. The area is relatively dry. The 19,000 acre reservoir offers excellent recreation opportunities. Boysen reservoir holds the state record for walleye at 17 lbs. 6 3/4 oz. It offers excellent ice fishing in the winter. Many type of water foul and wildlife may be viewed in the area. Groceries, bait, fuel for boats, campgrounds with some hookups, and fishing licenses are available at the marina at the north end of the reservoir. Boysen Reservoir contains a diverse fishery. Anglers will discover walleye, sauger, perch, crappie, ling, rainbow, cutthroat and brown trout as the major sports species. Other game fish present are largemouth bass, bluegill, stonecat, black bullhead, mountain whitefish, lake trout, brook trout and splake. Non-game species include carp, fathead minnow, plains killifish, golden and sand shiners; flathead, lake and creek chubs; white, longnose and northern redhorse suckers; and the river carpsucker. recently Boysen holds the state record on three types of fish; the walleye at 17.42 lbs, the black crappie at 2.34 lbs and the carp sucker at 6.15 lbs. The walleye is also a world record through the ice. Along with fishing, swimming, skiing on the lake, one could take a white water rafting trip through the Wing River Canyon. Tour the dinosaur museum in Thermopolis or any of the other several museums in the area, visit the Wind River Indian Reservation, Study the geological formation throughout the canyon or view the wildlife and look for elusive big horn sheep in the canyon. For information call: (307)876-2796


Edness Kimball Wilkins State Park
Edness K. Wilkins State Park is a serene day-use park located 6 miles east of Casper off Interstate 25 where families, nature lovers and those looking for solitude can enjoy the huge old cottonwoods as they cast reflections on the historic North Platte River and lend shade to visitors. A pond, with its sandy beach, is an oasis in the summer months and the North Platte River provides a natural habitat for a variety of wildlife, and for fishing, canoeing and rafting. Today a visitor can utilize picnic tables, grills, group shelters, playgrounds and a launching ramp for canoes or rafts. The handicapped accessible fishing pier, the only one like it in the state, has become one of the finest amenities provided to visitors. An additional 2.8 miles of handicapped accessible hard-surfaced paths provide visitors with an opportunity to view some of the finest wildlife in the area. Anglers can try their fishing luck in the North Platte River and swimmers can take a refreshing dip at the park swimming area. For information call: (307)577-5150


Glendo State Park
Glendo is best known for it's excellent boating opportunities--We have lots of area for water skiing and some great fishing too. You're right in the middle of a very historic area. Ask some questions and get to know it a little. After an enjoyable stay at the park, visit our many other state parks and historic sites. For information call: (307)735-4433


Keyhole State Park
Keyhole State Park welcomes all visitors from around the world. There are activities for everyone to enjoy--Swimming, sunbathing,hiking our volksmarch trail, boating, water-skiing, birdwatching and fishing. Some of Wyoming's largest fish have been caught at Keyhole. Keyhole Offers Many Attractions and is located on the western edge of the famed Black Hills, between Sundance and Moorcroft, and is easily accessed off I-90 at exit 165 or take exits 153 or 564 in Moorcroft then Hwy 14 north six miles then Hwy 113. Within sight of Devils Tower, Keyhole State Park is situated along the southeast shore of Keyhole Reservoir and offers excellent fishing for walleye, catfish, small mouth bass and northern pike. Keyhole is also a mecca for both resident and migrating birds of all species. Visitors have the opportunity to view many type of wildlife including mule deer, white tailed deer, and wild turkeys. For information call: (307)756-3596


Seminoe State Park
The Seminoe Mountains around Seminoe State Park were once the site for gold prospecting during the late 1800s. The name "Seminoe" is commonly assumed to come from the Seminole tribe, but is an Americanized spelling of the French name Cimineau. Basil Cimineau Lajeunesse was a French trapper in the area in the 1800. Seminoe State Park, located on the northwest side of the reservoir, was established in 1965 through an agreement between the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the Wyoming Recreation Commission (the predecessor to Wyoming State Parks & Historic Sites). Seminoe is just 34 miles north of Sinclair and boasts good fishing for trout and walleye. Boaters enjoy the largest reservoir in the state park system. Only 12 miles north of the park is Wyoming's "Miracle Mile," a prime fishing stretch of the North Platte River. The 20,291 acres of water offers excellent Trout and Walleye fishing. Wildlife and waterfowl are abundant in the area. For information call: (307)320-3013


Other Wyoming Outdoor activities

Wyoming also offers the following outdoor activities:
  • Bicycling
  • Climbing
  • Cross Country Skiing
  • Golf
  • Horseback Riding
  • Rafting
  • Skiing
  • Tennis